Tag Archives: Hip Hop

His Name is DJ Scend, Not DJ Send Off

Chicago’s Stephan Steciw, a.k.a. DJ Scend, grew up surrounded with many musical influences. His father is a musician and introduced him to instruments at an early age.  His own style of DJing covers hip-hop and house, both old and new, while still maintaining a unique Chicago beat.  Thanks to social networking sites and CRB Radio (Chitown Record Bangers), DJ Scend is able to quickly get his music out to his fans.  Chitown Record Bangers Radio is a big part of DJ Scend’s musical career.  He mixes there every Wednesday from 6 to 8 pm and fans can listen live to DJ Scend mix a dope fresh style of the old with the new. He smoothly mixes in ol’ school hits like 2Pac’s, I get around, with recent tracks from today’s artists like Kanye West.  He can be seen spinning live at Sopo Lounge (3418 N. Southport Ave.), Junior’s (2058 W. Cermak Rd.), Bon-V (1100 W. Randolph St.) and many other Chicago nightclubs.  DJ Scend’s hip-house mixes truly represent the Chicago urban music scene. DJ Scend took some time out to talk to me about CRB Radio and his other ventures, and here’s what he had to say:

How did you get into your DJ career?

I got into music at the age of 5.  I started on the piano and then moved to guitar. When I turned 18, I bought my first set of turntables.  My father is a musician and I grew up around a studio environment, so it was easy for me to choose music as my ultimate career goal.

Getting started in the music business can be challenging.  How did you attain exposure and new fans?

A lot of my recent exposure has come from my weekly mixshow that I host and run for CRB Radio (www.crbradio.com).  CRB stands for Chitown Record Bangers, and our goal as musicians is to give people a constant stream of music that is different and also familiar.

I do a lot of self promotion as well.  I’m constantly on Twitter and Facebook doing the geeky internet ‘thing’ with posting mixes and recordings of my radio mixshow to help get my sound out there.  I also do street work when I can, as far as putting up posters and flyers and just trying to support events whenever I can.

I imagine it is a rush being in front of a crowd.  What is it you like most about your DJ career?

The biggest thing I love about being a DJ is when someone approaches me at the end of the night at the end of my set and says “I want to thank you for helping me forget everything tonight.  Your set made me appreciate music all over again.” That right there is the biggest payout I can ask for.  I’ve gotten that [reaction] numerous times and that’s what keeps pushing me to stay on top of my own game.  No money can compare.

That’s great.  How do you contribute to music and the community?

I would like to think that I contribute to music by helping expose some styles and genres of music that most might not be used to hearing.  I like to play all types of music and like to ‘break records’ whenever I have the chance to do so…I try to involve myself in local art shows to help bring the community together under the umbrella of music.

Spin it ScendThis style of music is rapidly gaining a large fan following. What advice do you have for newcomers who are faced with the choice of getting a degree or following their passions? Does getting an education fit in your musical career?

Since I never finished college, the biggest positive I gained from school was meeting all the different people.  In the end, all those different people end up choosing different career paths that somehow, [in] someway [I get lucky and they] end up coming back [in my life] with something I can network with –whether it’s [with] a designer, marketing director, or another musician, we all find a way to trade each other’s skills to benefit and support one another.

Did the time you spent in school help out with your career choice?

School can definitely help out from a business standpoint.  Every artist needs to be business savvy because we are all marketing ourselves on a constant basis.  School may not be able to teach you creativity or artistic integrity, but it can definitely help you out with how to approach the music industry as a whole.

What influenced you to choose the style of music you work with?

I started as a hip-hop DJ.  I only played underground and old school hip-hop.  I started realizing that to make a name and gain exposure; I would need to play other styles of hip-hop.  I started getting into more of the radio music and mixing that up with underground.

I then got into the house music scene heavily.  A lot of people I work with currently [had] met me as a ‘house’ DJ.  I started trying to bridge the gap for myself by learning to mix both genres.  After being given my own mix show for CRB Radio, almost 2 years ago, I was almost forced to constantly keep a fresh style and sound.  It helped me greatly because I would dig for all sorts of different music.  To me it’s not about a genre, it’s about a sound.  If it’s good, it’s good…end of story.

Are you currently working on other projects beside the weekly Mixshow on CRB Radio?

I’m doing some production now and I’m also working on bringing Chicago MC’s on my show to ‘rep’ Chicago music.

DJ Scend spins every Wednesday on CRB live, Friday’s at Sopo Lounge,

Thursdays at the Wicker Well from 9 to 2, and Saturdays at Tini Martini’s main room.

Isaura Salinas

For the 411 on upcoming events for DJ Scend, check these sites out:

http://www.crbradio.com

http://www.mediafire.com/mrscend

http://www.youtube.com/djscend1

http://twitter.com/djscend

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They Call Him Boogy

23-year-old Boogy

With hip-hop taking a turn, seemingly for the worst, it’s refreshing to see artists staying true to the blueprint of hip-hop. While schooling other rappers on the microphone, 23-year-old Boogy is also a full-time college student. For some, finding a balance between school and music can be a difficult task, but Boogy handles the two with ease. His lyrics demand an active listener but still manage to be colorfully playful. Boogy is patiently perfecting his craft hoping to become the pride and joy of Chicago’s hip-hop scene.

What school are you attending and what are you studying?

I attend South Suburban College in South Holland IL. I am currently studying business management, with the hopes of one day becoming an agent or manager.

How were you introduced to music? What about music attracted you?

My parents were both really musical people. My pops played drums and was into all types of music. I was always drawn to music. I have always been attracted to the soul of music. I believe every genre of music has its own soul, which is why music really is the universal language. When I was younger I was very concerned with having my parents think I was cool, so I was really into whatever they would listen to. My mom was a child of the ‘70s and a woman of the ‘80s and early ‘90s. Anything pop or R&B she was on top of. Everything from Anita Baker to Salt-n-Pepa, my O.G. was rockin’ to. My Pops is why I’m so well rounded when it comes to music. He always listened to everything. Hendrix, Joni Mitchell, Pac, Santana, Eric Clapton, Queen, Bob Marley, everything! He really got me into rock and funk the most.

Since you were introduced to such a wide variety of music growing up, what instruments do you play or interest you the most?

Since I was young, I’ve always been interested in the drums. When I would be in church I would just zone out and have visions of me spazzin’ on the drum set right in the middle of service. I never got my own set, but I did learn how to play, even got to play in church a few times. I also learned how to play guitar in 8th grade, but I forgot all that shit by now.

So, you go by “Boogy.” Where does this name come from?

I had this older cousin name Keith, I would only see him during holidays but I always liked kickin’ it with him cuz’ he smoked weed and always had dope rap to listen to. One day we were rocking to an old Big Daddy Kane tape and he was shocked I knew it. He was like, “Oh you like that shit, huh lil’ cuz? Look at T-Boogy over there jammin’ like he know ‘bout this.” Everybody laughed and kept calling me that since then.

Your music doesn’t sound like any of the commercial rap that floods the airways. Where do you get your inspiration?

The city and life really influences my music. The complexity of the average life gives an artist a lifetime worth of material. I grew up in the city and the suburbs, which help mold my music in a very major way. When you witness the highest of highs and the lowest of lows you look at the world through a different scope. You have an understanding of why. A lot more than a person who only knows one perspective. It allows me to have a genuine appeal in all of my music, no matter what I’m talking about.

What artists have influenced you?

I’m influenced by so many artists. Any artist that I listen to I try to add an element of them in my music because I strongly believe putting all of those random influences together make me an original. My favorite rapper is Jay-Z. I feel like he has done better and is unlike any one else ever. Huge fan of Biggie, Nas, Pac, Jadakiss, Outkast, Joe Budden, Rakim, Big Daddy Kane, and tons more. I’m also a huge R&B fan. I love classics like Marvin Gaye, Michael Jackson,Isaac Hayes, Isley Brothers, Stevie Wonder, George Clinton, Anita Baker, Mary J, Aaliyah, Erykah Badu,Jill Scott, Marsha Ambrosius.

Cell Blok (left) and Boogy (Right) performing

I’m into some rock and reggae also. Depends on my mood. But I take all of that and pour it into my music.

Seeing all of your influences really helps explain your sound. There are a lot of old-school undertones in your music, yet it’s still very catchy and relevant to today. How would you describe your sound?
My sound is intelligent street thought, meets classy stuntin,’ meets mood-provoking music.

How do you think school affects your music career?

Besides giving me time to write, it really doesn’t. Every now and then I will hear something in class that I may want to throw in a song, but it is very rare.

Gives you time to write? How so? Do you write during class?

You damn right I write in class. 85% of school is bullshit. They overcharge us to take a bunch of bullshit classes that teach us shit we will never use in life. So I learn what I need to learn to pass the tests, but most of my class time is spent writing.

How does school influence, if at all, your music?

None whatsoever.

How do you balance time between your music career and you schoolwork?

I get the B.S. of school out of the way as quickly as possible. The more time I have to dedicate to my craft, the better. But I also realize school is something that I have to do, so I do it.

What are your plans after graduation?

Go forward in building our music label and studio.

Aspiring rapper, Boogy

That’s excellent. Are you currently performing anywhere?

 
All over the city if I can. I’m always searching for more venues just to get my face out there and rock with the people. I have performed at many open mics throughout the city and suburbs.

Are there any musical projects coming up?

I’m currently working on three mix tapes. Schwing!, Grow Up, and Marijuana Music 2.

Download a free copy of Marijuana Music today!

-Lauren Cain

Mos Scocious Lets the Good Times Roll, Chicago Style

Mos Scocious brings their unique mix of sounds to a recent show.

Tucked inside a relatively quiet block in Lincoln Park, a small bar explodes with an upbeat, unique blend of rock, soul, jazz, funk, hip-hop, and blues at 10PM sharp on the first Wednesday night of every month, courtesy of Chicago’s own Mos Scocious.

This little venue, the Tonic Room, which is about the size of my two-bedroom apartment, is packed with fans of several different walks of life that go crazy when Mos Scocious takes the stage around 11:30. The party is just getting started. Securing a spot by the cozy fireplace, I witness a musical amalgam – rap in one song, slow blues in the next, then a medley of The Beatles’ “And I Love Her” and “She Loves You.” People dance, take pictures, and raise their glasses to the music. It’s “First Wednesday,” and everyone is having a good time.

From left: Bradley Butterworth, Rob Dicke, and Josh Rosen

Mos Scocious is comprised of three recent Columbia College grads: Josh Rosen [bass, guitar, vocals], Bradley Butterworth [guitar, bass, vocals], and Rob Dicke [drums], all of whom met in Jazz Performance classes in college. The motivation to form the group came from both inside and outside of the classroom. “Just being amongst talented artists and musicians has inspired us more than any class ever could. However, theory and ear training classes were essential to help turn our inspiration into tangible musical ideas,” Rosen tells me following the show. Those ideas came together in the spring of 2006, and Mos Scocious was born.

I asked Rosen where the name comes from. “It’s a Creole phrase that loosely translates to ‘All-Around Good Time.’” Seems fitting for a group that took its favorite parts of  every genre to create its own, totally unique sound – a sound Rosen says was undoubtedly shaped by Mos Scocious’s beloved home city. “Chicago has not only influenced our sound, but it is our sound. We are inspired by everything the city has to offer. Everything we experience in this city comes out in a small way in our songs.” The band termed its sound “freak-funk” because  “[it’s] the sound from the underground. It’s toe-tappin’, groove-based music that isn’t confined to any musical boundaries.”

Mos Scocious’s eclectic sound is due in          large part to the diversity of the members’ geographic and musical backgrounds. The band says, “Our hometowns are all spread throughout the Midwest. Brad is from just outside of Detroit, MI; he brings the Rock/Fusion/Jam vibe. Josh is from Cleveland Heights, OH, and brings the Motown/Blues/Funk vibe. Rob is from Peoria, IL, [and] he brings the Jazz/Soul/Latin vibe. Put us all together, and it’s a nice little salad with a BIG sound!” The variety of influences comes out in each and every song. Mos Scocious has been known to cover Gnarls Barkley and The Sound of Music and then crank out a fan favorite: a rap called “Garmonbozia,” also known as “The Alligator Song.” When they break into the song at Tonic Room, a fan next to me starts dancing so wildly that he bumps into everyone around him and almost spills his drink.

In addition to First Wednesdays, the trio has several Midwestern and East Coast dates under its belt. After playing numerous other Chicago venues  — the Kinetic Playground, Subterranean, Cubby Bear, Reggie’s, Martyr’s, Gallery Cabaret, and Elbo Room, among others — Mos Scocious recently brought their sound to Minnesota (Rochester), Ohio (Cleveland and Columbus), Illinois (Peoria and DeKalb), Michigan (Flint, Royal Oak, and Rochester), and New York (Binghamton and New York City). They also recorded an LP called Ibble Dabble in 2008.

When the opportunity arose to book a recurring hometown gig, the band accepted. “We were asked by Michael Berg and Jess Blanc of 3D-MAS Productions to play on their Wednesday Night Affair at the Tonic Room about 2 years ago.  There is no place we would rather be on a Wednesday.  It’s a great place to hear live music,” Rosen says.  “For us, it just became a very comfortable place to play.  We were approached by Berg in December to start up a once-a-month residency at Tonic Room in February. We couldn’t have been more excited.”

What else does the future hold for Mos Scocious? Although many students are forced to either drop out of school or give up music to pursue full-time careers after graduation, Mos Scocious is becoming a career for Rosen, Butterworth, and Dicke. Rosen says they’re in it for the long haul. “Our future plans are to make Mos Scocious our full-time job. This includes touring, writing, recording, marketing, living, loving, etc. It will take a lot of sacrifices, but we are up for the challenge and are ready to take over the world!” It sounds to me like they’re going to have a really great time along the way.

Kayla Zimmerman

Check out Mos Scocious on Myspace, Facebook, and  Sonicbids. And catch the band live at Tonic Room on April 7 and May 5 (2447 N. Halsted, 10:00 PM, $5) as well as at Gallery Cabaret on April 9 (2020 N. Oakley, 8:00 PM, Free).

What’s Happening This Week: March 10-16, 2010

Wednesday, March 10

The Gunshy w/ Jared Grabb, The Sky We Scrape, & The Spend (21+) @ Subterranean (2011 North Ave.), 9:00 PM, $8

Fresh Produce Hip-Hop Producer Battle (18+) @ Reggie’s Rock Club (2105 S. State), 9:00 PM, $10

Thursday, March 11

Very Truly Yours w/ Summer Cats & City Center (21+) @ Subterranean (2011 North Ave.), 9:00 PM, $8

A Modern Love Story’s LAST CHICAGO SHOW EVER (17+) @ Beat Kitchen (2100 W. Belmont), 8:00 PM, $8

Koku Gonza w/ DJ Shannon & Blah Blah Blah (18+) @ Reggie’s Rock Club (2105 S. State), 8:00 PM, $8

Friday, March 12

Vivian Girls w/ Male Bonding & The Alright Alreadies (17+) @ Subterranean (2011 North Ave.), 9:30 PM, $12

Pelican w/ Pinebender & Follows (17+) @ Beat Kitchen (2100 W. Belmont), 9:30 PM, $12 adv. $14 door

Curren$y w/ Mikkey Halsted, etc. (18+) @ Reggie’s Rock Club (2105 S. State), 8:00 PM, $20

FutureRetro w/ DJ Peroxide (21+) @ Lucky Number Grill (1931 N. Milwaukee), 9:00 PM, $5

Saturday, March 13

Harvey Milk w/ Coalesce & The Atlas Moth (17+) @ Subterranean (2011 North Ave.), 9:30 PM, $13 adv. $15 door

Family of the Year w/ The Help Desk & The Queen Killing Kings (all ages) @ Beat Kitchen (2100 W. Belmont), 7:00 PM, $10

Zola Jesus w/ Beau Wanzer & Fielded (17+) @ Beat Kitchen (2100 W. Belmont), 10:30 PM, $8

Sunday, March 14

Howlin Tumbleweeds w/ The Canoes, The Earth is a Man, & Slowhawks (17+) @ Subterranean (2011 North Ave.), 8:00 PM, $10

Zephuros w/ Ben Keeler, Katie & Pat, & Steven Gilpin (21+) @ Beat Kitchen (2100 W. Belmont), 7:30 PM, $8

Tuesday, March 16

Arma w/ Outernational, Chester, & Bullet Called Life (17+) @ Subterranean (2011 North Ave.), 7:30 PM, $8

Black Dahlia Murder w/ Obscura, Augury, & Hatesphere (all ages) @ Reggie’s Rock Club (2105 S. State), 5:00 PM, $13

:: We’re looking for more budget-friendly and student shows! To add one to this list, please comment here or hit us up on Facebook ::